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Recently at The Rumpus: The Rumpus Interview with Ashley Farmer

Rumpus: When you’re writing, how do you regard the role of the reader? How conscious are you of that role when you’re putting a story together?

Farmer: You know, with these pieces, I don’t know that I thought about it as much as I do now. I suppose I have a kind of faith and trust in a reader—that even an image or a detail can resonate somehow. And so I can’t say that with the pieces in Beside Myself, I really thought about that. It was more of a meditation for me on language and image. And then being able to share it with people—finding that some people can respond to it, appreciate some aspects of it, is really satisfying, something I’m grateful for.

I talked with Ashley Farmer about her new short story collection Beside Myself. I think it is a good convo! You can maybe tell that I approached her book from a certain perspective, and I came away from the interview with a broader perspective, which is one of the best things you can have happen to you while putting together this sort of piece.

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fantagraphics:

arecomicsevengood:

Jaime Hernandez, The Love Bunglers. I feel like this spread is a motherfucker even if you don’t know the scenes it’s referencing, if you didn’t read the stories where they originally appeared. This is what it’s like to live with someone, or even just to live. Give it a stare until it hits you.

The Love Bunglers

fantagraphics:

arecomicsevengood:

Jaime Hernandez, The Love Bunglers. I feel like this spread is a motherfucker even if you don’t know the scenes it’s referencing, if you didn’t read the stories where they originally appeared. This is what it’s like to live with someone, or even just to live. Give it a stare until it hits you.

The Love Bunglers

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I Just Watched: The Raid 2, dir. Gareth Evans

If knowing that this movie is the sequel to The Raid or that it features characters billed as “Baseball Bat Man” and “Hammer Girl” is not incentive enough to check it out, maybe nothing would be, but for anybody interested in fight choreography as a part of filmmaking, this stuff is essential.

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via the Gahan Wilson gallery at The Golden Age

via the Gahan Wilson gallery at The Golden Age

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I Just Read: The Intuitionist by Colson Whitehead; I Just Watched: The Killing of a Chinese Bookie, dir. John Cassavetes, and Captain America: The Winter Soldier, dir. Joe and Anthony Russo

I liked all of these but uggggghhhh I liked Winter Soldier the most, I am part of the problem

"C’mon, Greg."

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Always.

Always.

(Source: lordgoldthrone, via iamdavidbrothers)

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I Just Watched: Bob and Carol and Ted and Alice, dir. Paul Mazursky

This movie is sixties in some pretty unfortunate ways; posterity is going to be increasingly unkind.

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millionsmillions:

80 years ago Samuel Beckett’s publisher rejected his short story “Echo’s Bones” because it gave him the “jim-jams.” The 13,500-word piece on the afterlife was intended for More Pricks Than Kicks until his editor Charles Prentice claimed, “People will shudder and be puzzled and confused; and they won’t be keen on analysing the shudder.” Fortunately, it will finally be published by Faber and Faber on April 17.

millionsmillions:

80 years ago Samuel Beckett’s publisher rejected his short story “Echo’s Bones” because it gave him the “jim-jams.” The 13,500-word piece on the afterlife was intended for More Pricks Than Kicks until his editor Charles Prentice claimed, “People will shudder and be puzzled and confused; and they won’t be keen on analysing the shudder.” Fortunately, it will finally be published by Faber and Faber on April 17.

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Recently at The Rumpus: The Rumpus Interview with Duncan Wall

I’ve actually started just stealing a metaphor that Pascal Jacob uses. He talks about a tree. He says that the roots of the circus—you get the PowerPoint image of the tree with roots that extend to the ground—those are the circus arts. They’re dispersive and they go way back. You don’t quite know where they end. And they come together into this solidified form in 1768. That becomes the trunk of the tree—hard, in the same way that the circus was hard and kind of codified, and circular, in the way it had that circular form. Then that goes up for two hundred years. Then in 1968, the form proliferates all over again. It explodes into branches.

I talked to circus historian and former student of the circus arts Duncan Wall. Not really knowing anything about circus history, I hesitated to take this project. Then I decided to take it because I didn’t know anything about circus history. This is not always a wise way to do business! But I’d like to think the interview turned out well.